J. Chem. En. Sci. A.

Maternal Health in Haryana: Evidences from NFHS

Ms Poonam Sandhir

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  • DOI Number
    https://doi.org/10.15415/jce.2017.41005
KEYWORDS

Maternal Health Care, NFHS, Women Education

PUBLISHED DATE September 6, 2017
PUBLISHER The Author(s) 2017. This article is published with open access at www.chitkara.edu.in/publications.
ABSTRACT

The paper is based on National Family Health Survey (NFHS) Haryana data collected during third and fourth round of survey. In terms of maternal health care indicators like ANC, IFA consumption, TT, assisted births, institutional births and PNC, Haryana performed better than India for parameters like TT, assisted deliveries and PNC; at par for IFA tablets and lower for ANC and institutional deliveries. Punjab was ahead of Haryana in terms of all these parameters. All these maternal health care indicators had a positive relationship with the raise in the educational level of the women. With the education the awareness level of women gets enhanced and they understand the importance of vital factors than their uneducated counterparts. Our policy planners and programme implementers should keep this important point well in mind that education is the key to easy eradication of all these problems and education of women will assist in achieving better results

INTRODUCTION

In any human society, the care of mothers and children is the most vital social-health issue. Scientifically (in the preventive medicine), maternal and child health (MCH) care has been defined as “the field of work related to the physical, mental and emotional health of women, immediately before, during and after the child birth of infant and young children”, (R. S. Goyal, 1989). Maternal and Child Health/ Reproductive and Child Health (MCH/RCH) includes an effective antenatal, intra-natal and postnatal care for women and timely complete immunisation, provision of early detection and treatment of diseases and basic medical care when needed by the children.

Women who are the prime producer of life, on whom society depends upon for support and family health care; and the children who are our future and who will fulfil our dreams are the main targets of inequalities, injustices and inadequate health care in our society. The MCH services were started in India with the training of indigenous dais in 1866 by Miss Hewlett of the Church of England Zenana Mission, followed by other voluntary agencies, and of midwifery supervisors and Lady Health Visitors in 1918 (P. R. Dutt, 1993). After independence, with the UNICEF assistance, the MCH services gained importance. However poverty, illiteracy and associated social and cultural values are the major obstacles in this process. In order to lead our nation towards a healthy future, the government has been emphasizing the need for the safety of both the mother as well as the child, and to achieve this, special schemes have been formulated and launched for RCH care. RCH health service is one of the major programme of health care delivery system. The primary health centres (PHCs) are the main nuclei to render service to mother and child in rural areas through the network of sub-centres (SCs).

Page(s) 31-35
URL http://dspace.chitkara.edu.in/jspui/bitstream/123456789/799/1/JCE%204-1-5.pdf
ISSN Print : 2349-7564, Online : 2349-7769
DOI https://doi.org/10.15415/jce.2017.41005
CONCLUSION

In terms of maternal health care indicators like ANC, IFA consumption, TT, assisted births, institutional births and PNC, Haryana has improved from NFHS-3 to NFHS4. When compared with India and neighbouring state of Punjab, Haryana performed better than India for parameters like TT, assisted deliveries and PNC; at par for IFA tablets and lower for ANC and institutional deliveries. Punjab was ahead of Haryana in terms of all these parameters. A common characteristic for these maternal health care indicators (ANC, IFA consumption, TT, assisted births, institutional births and PNC) was that they all had a positive relationship with the increase in the educational level of the women. The results show that education is very important in today’s world and no body should be deprived of it. With the education the awareness level of women gets enhanced and they understand the importance of vital factors than their uneducated counterparts. So our schemes and programmes in the near future should target more on less educated women in this direction. Our policy planners and programme implementers should keep this important point well in mind that education is the key to easy eradication of all these problems and education of women will assist in achieving better results.

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